Letter From Birmingham Jail
Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. wrote this letter on April 16, 1963, to his fellow clergymen in order to explain his non-violent, direct actions in Birmingham. It was his answer to many questions that had been asked of him by these pastors and priests. I have broken the full text into five sections, and each of you will be assigned a particular excerpt. You may want to read a paragraph or two above your excerpt and/or a paragraph or two afterwards to better understand your assigned section.
Prompt: You and a partner will read an assigned excerpt from Dr. King's letter and then choose two quotes (1 to 3 sentences each) that you think are very important, interesting, or applicable. Using PowerPoint or Google Presentation software, explain these quotes to the class. In your explanation, you should explain why MLK wrote these words (including background info) and what he meant (what he was trying to get across to his fellow clergymen), but also what these quotes mean to you, or still mean in this present time. In your presentation slides, include the quotes, a picture that relates, and bullet-pointed lists (not complete sentences) that will aid you in your explanation of these quotes.


Rubric:

20 points
15 points
10 points
5 points
0 points
Slide Format
Students include two quotes, (a) picture(s), and bullet-pointed lists of thoughts/ reflections/ explanations of two quotes from the Letter from a Birmingham Jail. Student does not use complete sentences (except for the MLK letter quotes), but rather uses key words to help them remember what they want to say.
Students include two quotes, a picture, and a bullet-pointed list of thoughts/ reflections/ explanation of each quote. Student uses complete sentences in their slides to express their thoughts instead of just picking key words to help them remember.
Students include most of the important aspects, but there are missing a couple items (quotes, bullet-pointed lists, pictures).
Students include some of the important aspects, but there are missing a number of items (quotes, bullet-pointed lists, pictures).
Students include one of the important aspects, but there are missing most of the items (quotes, bullet-pointed lists, pictures).
Explanation of MLK's meaning
Students explain the meaning and background of their chosen quotes thoroughly and concisely. Each student contributes equally.
Students explain the meaning and background of their chosen quotes adequately. Each student contributes equally.
Students explain the meaning and background of quotes, but it their explanation is not thorough or concise. Each student contributes equally.
Students attempt to explain the meaning and background of the quotes, but their explanation is unclear, or it is not completely accurate.
Or

Only one person speaks.
Students do not attempt to explain the meaning or background of the quotes they have chosen to present on.

Or

Quotes from the letter were note chosen.
Explanation of your thoughts on the meaning and importance of these quotes
Students explain how these quotes apply to our lives today and make the quotes personal in a thorough, concise fashion. Each student contributes equally.
Students explain how these quotes apply to our lives today and make the quotes personal in an adequate fashion. Each student contributes equally.
Students explain how these quotes apply to our lives today or make the quotes personal, but their explanation is not thorough or concise. Each student contributes equally.
Students attempt to explain how these quotes apply to our lives today or attempt to make the quotes personal, but their explanation is unclear, or it is not completely accurate.

Or

Only one person speaks.
Students do not attempt to explain personal thoughts of meaning and importance in the quotes they have chosen to present on.

Or

Quotes from the letter were note chosen.
Presentation
Speaking voice is clear and concise, students make eye contact with the audience, presentation is between 3 and 5 minutes
Voice is clear and concise, but not much eye contact is made to include the audience. Presentation is between 3 and 5 minutes.


Speaking voice is either unclear (hard to hear) or the speaker is not concise.Eye contact is made. Presentation is between 3 and 5 minutes.
Speaking voice is either unclear (hard to hear) or the speaker is not concise, and not much eye contact is made to include the audience. Presentation is between 3 and 5 minutes.

The presentation is hard to understand.
Or
The presentation is less than 2 minutes long.
Use of Standard English
Students use excellent Standard English including good use of vocabulary.
Students use correct Standard English
Students use words similar to "like" or "um" frequently in their presentation
Students use incorrect verbs or slang words frequently
Students use "like" or "um" frequently, and use incorrect verbs or slang words frequently








MLK Google Spreadsheet Project

Prompt: Create a graph that shows inequalities in our world using factual data.

Step 1:
Brainstorm ideas about statistics that could be used to show inequalities around the world. These statistics may deal with our own country – racism, gender roles, etc – or they can compare the people of this country to the people of another country.

Step 2:
Once you have come up with an idea or two, use the internet to research statistics on your topic. Be sure to use web sites that have accurate data, and keep record of your resources, as they will need to appear in your final product. Here are some possible websites (Be sure to also see any links that might give you data):

Racial Discrimination:
http://www.isreview.org/issues/32/racism.shtml
http://soundvision.com/info/racism/statistics.asp

Gender Discrimination:
http://womeninbusiness.about.com/od/challengeswomenface/a/genderdiscrim.htm
http://www.forbes.com/2004/06/23/cx_da_0623topnews.html

Poverty and Hunger in our World:
http://www.worldhunger.org/articles/Learn/world%20hunger%20facts%202002.htm
http://www.hopeinternational.org/site/PageServer?pagename=hms_poverty_statistics
http://heartsandminds.org/poverty/hungerfacts.htm
http://www.unicef.org/sowc05/english/statistics.html
http://www.globalissues.org/article/26/poverty-facts-and-stats
http://web.worldbank.org/WBSITE/EXTERNAL/TOPICS/EXTPOVERTY/0,,contentMDK:20205999~menuPK:497971~pagePK:148956~piPK:216618~theSitePK:336992,00.html

Step 3:
Open Google and sign in. Create a new spreadsheet (Click on Drive at the top, Create, then Spreadsheet). Put data into the worksheet. Be sure to have a title and at least two columns of data with at least four rows (or four columns with at least two rows)

Step 4:
Create a chart (graph) based on your findings. Here are the steps to making a graph.
  1. Drag to select the data that will be used for your graph (including the column headings).
  2. Click on chart icon on the toolbar at the top, then choose the best type of chart from the charts group.
  3. Underneath your chart, skip a row or two, and then list the websites that you used in your research.

Step 5:
Reflect - Skip another row below your website list. Then, answer the following questions in complete sentences:
  1. Why does this inequality still exist in the world?
  2. What can be done? How can we bring about justice?

Step 6:
Share your chart with Mr. Ward. Click on “Share” at the top, then add Mr. Ward’s e-mail address (wardb@psmnow.com) in the “Add people” box.

Rubric (100 points)–
100 pts.
90 pts
80 pts
70 pts
60 pts or less
Chart shows a major inequality of the world, based on factual information. Compares at least two subjects.
Neat and organized with an excellent chart.
Websites are listed below the chart, and reflections are written in complete sentences.
All aspects of the project are clear and thorough.
Chart shows a major inequality of the world, based on factual information. Compares at least two subjects.
Neat and organized with an excellent chart.
Websites are listed below the chart,
and reflections are written in complete sentences.
Some aspects of the project are not clear or thorough.
Chart shows a major inequality of the world, based on factual information.
Compares at least two subjects.

Websites are listed below the chart, but reflection responses are missing.
Chart shows a major inequality of the world, based on factual information. Compares at least two subjects. Websites and responses are missing.
Chart exists, but fails to show an inequality of the world.