Chapter 1: Team Time - Promoting Future Technologies
Problem:
People are often overwhelmed by the relentless march of technology. Accessibility of information is changing the way we work, play, and interact with our friends, family, and co-workers. In this Team Time, we consider the future and reflect on how the advent of new technologies will affect our daily lives 10 years in the future.

Process:
In pairs:
1. Use the Internet to research up-and-coming technologies. Prepare a list of innovations that you believe will occur in the next 10 years. Determine how they will be integrated into society and the effect they will have on our culture.
2. Present your group's findings to the class for debate and discussion. Not specifically how the rest of the class reacts to your reports on the innovations. Are they excited? Skeptical? Incredulous? Do they laugh off your ideas, or do they become wildly enthusiastic?
Individually:
3. Choose one of the innovations and write a marketing strategy paper that details how you would promote the technological change that you envision for the future. Also note some barriers for acceptance the technology may have to overcome, as well as any legal or ethical challenges or questions you see the new technology posing.
4. Submit: Either share with Mr. Ward (wardb@psmnow.com) on GoogleDrive or e-mail the document to wardb@psmnow.com.

Rubric:
Points
Criteria
100
Marketing strategy thoroughly and succinctly describes and promotes one technology innovation of the future. The marketing strategy also describes barriers for acceptance and legal or ethical challenges that may arise. The Marketing Strategy has excellent grammar, and has no spelling mistakes.
90
Marketing strategy thoroughly and succinctly describes and promotes one technology innovation of the future. The marketing strategy also describes barriers for acceptance and legal or ethical challenges that may arise. There are 5-10 grammar/spelling mistakes.
80
Marketing strategy describes and promotes one technology innovation of the future very clearly. The marketing strategy also describes barriers for acceptance and legal or ethical challenges that may arise. There may be 1-10 grammar/spelling mistakes.
70
Marketing strategy describes and promotes one technology innovation, but does not discuss barriers for acceptance or legal/ethical challenges.
60
Written proposal is hardly acceptable. Marketing strategy is written out, but it is not clear, or there are more than 10 grammar/spelling mistakes.


Chapter 2: Team Time - PCs Versus Apples - Which is Best?
Problem:
There are two major classes of computer systems in the marketplace today: PC's (Windows machines) and Apple computers. Many people have chosen one camp with an almost religious fervor. In this exercise, pairs of students will explore the trade-offs between a PC and an Apple computer and defend their allegiance to one system or the other.

Task:
You will first be assigned as one Type of person or the other.

Type A: a group of PC die-hards who believe these computers perform as well as Apple systems and cost less, thus providing better value.
Type B: a group of hard-working, Apple-loving users who believe there are no systems as user-friendly and reliable as those made by Apple.

Look at the following list of settings where these computers could be used. Each pair should decide why its particular system would be the best choice in each of these settings:

1. An elementary school considering incorporating more technology into the classroom.
2. A small accounting firm expanding into new offices.
3. A video production company considering producing digital video.
4. A computer system for a home office for an aspiring entrepreneur.

Process:
In pairs:
1. Research and discuss the components for the system you are recommending. Are any components better suited for each particular need? Consider input, output, processing, and storage devices. Are any special devices or peripherals required?
2. Write a summary position paper. For each of the four settings, support your system recommendation for your assigned computer system (PC or Apple).
3. Submit: Either share with Mr. Ward (wardb@psmnow.com) on GoogleDrive or e-mail the document to wardb@psmnow.com.

Rubric (25 points for each setting, for a total of 100)
Points
Criteria
25
Summary explains thoroughly how your assigned computer system (PC or Apple) is best for the situation. Your summary includes information about input, output, processing and storage devices. It also mentions special devices or peripherals that would be helpful in this situation. The summary has excellent grammar, and has no spelling mistakes.
20
Summary explains thoroughly how your assigned computer system (PC or Apple) is best for the situation. Your summary includes information about input, output, processing and storage devices. It also mentions special devices or peripherals that would be helpful in this situation. There are 2-5 grammar/spelling mistakes.
15
Summary explains thoroughly how your assigned computer system (PC or Apple) is best for the situation. Your summary includes information about input, output, processing and storage devices. There are 2-5 grammar/spelling mistakes.
10
Summary explains thoroughly how your assigned computer system (PC or Apple) is best for the situation. but does not include information about input, output, processing, and storage devices.
5
Written proposal is hardly acceptable. Summary is written out, but it is not clear, or there are more than 5 grammar/spelling mistakes.

Chapter 3: Team Time - Online Annoyances
Task: Report on / learn about online annoyances including spam, cookies, malware, adware, spyware, viruses, phishing.

Process:
1. You will first be divided into pairs, and then assigned a topic (one of the above).
2. Using the internet, research to find more about your topic. Teach your classmates! How can you help them to understand and remember how your online annoyance is different from the rest?
3. Prepare your presentation by finding or creating an image or slide that will help your classmates learn about your topic.

Rubric:
Points
Criteria
100
Presentation is clear and concise and fits perfectly into 60 to 80 seconds. Presenters use one image or slide that helps the class to understand their main points. Presenters do not stumble over words, do not say "like" or "um" or any other similar stuttering.
90
Presentation is clear and concise and fits perfectly into 60 to 80 seconds. Presenters use one image or slide that helps the class to understand their main points. Presenters may stumble over their words a bit, or say something like "um."
80
Presentation is clear and concise, but takes slightly longer than 80 seconds. Presenters use one image or slide that helps the class to understand their main points. Presenters may stumble over their words a bit, or say something like "um."
70
Presenters show that they understand their assigned topic and have a solution. The image chosen is inappropriate, unhelpful, or absent. Presenters may stumble over their words a bit, or say something like "um."
60
Presenters do not understand their assigned topic, or are extremely unclear in their explanation.

Chapter 5: Team Time - Choosing the Best OS
Problem:
You have been hired to help set up the technology requirements for a small advertising company. The company is holding off buying anything until the decision has been made as to the platform on which the computers should run. Obviously, one of the critical decisions is the operating system.

Task:
Recommend the appropriate operating system for the company.

Process:
1. Get into pairs. Each pair will represent one of the three primary operating systems today: Windows, Mac, and Linux.
2. As a team, research the pros and cons of your operating system. What features does it have that would benefit your company? What features does it not have that your company would need? Why (or why not) would your operating system be the appropriate choice? Why is your OS better (or worse) than either of the other two options?
3. Develop a presentation that states your position with regard to your operating system. Your presentation should have a recommendation and include facts to back it up.
4. Present.
5. As a class, decide which operating system would be the best choice for the company.

Rubric:
Points
Criteria
100
Presentation is clear and concise and fits perfectly into 60 to 80 seconds, and explains the pros and cons of their assigned operating system. Presenters use two or three slides to help the class understand their main points. Presenters do not stumble over words, do not say "like" or "um" or any other similar stuttering.
90
Presentation is clear and concise and fits perfectly into 60 to 80 seconds, and explains the pros and cons of their assigned operating system. Presenters use two or three slides to help the class understand their main points. Presenters may stumble over their words a bit, or say something like "um."
80
Presentation is clear and concise, but takes slightly longer than 80 seconds. Presenters use two or three slides to help the class understand their main points. Presenters may stumble over their words a bit, or say something like "um."
70
Presenters show that they understand their assigned operating system. Slides are inappropriate, unhelpful, or absent. Presenters may stumble over their words a bit, or say something like "um."
60
Presenters do not understand their assigned operating system, or are extremely unclear in their explanation.


Chapter 6: Team Time - Meeting a Corporation's Computing Needs
Problem:
In a large organization, whether it is a company or a college, the IT department often has to install several different types of computing systems. There certainly would be advantages to having every computer be identical, but because different departments have different needs and items are purchased at different times, it is typical for there to be significant differences between two computers in the same corporation.

Process:
1. Split into pairs. In pairs, decide whether you want to change the 312 computer lab into an Art lab or a Music lab.
2. Research to find specific software, port specifications, storage and memory specifications, and peripherals that would make this lab appropriate for either Art or Music needs. During your research, choose at least one webpage that is especially helpful and critique it according to Authority, Bias, Relevancy, Audience, and Links.
3. Write a report that summarizes your findings. If purchasing a new system is more economical, recommend which system should be bought for this lab.
4. Submit: Either share with Mr. Ward (wardb@psmnow.com) on GoogleDrive or e-mail the document to wardb@psmnow.com.

Rubric:
Points
Criteria
100
Excellently written proposal describes software, types of ports, storage and memory specifications, as well as computer parts that would be necessary for either an art lab or a music lab. Students use at least one excellent online resource, and they show that they have thought through their decision by including a critique of the webpages Authority, Bias, Relevancy, Audience and Links. The proposal has excellent grammar, and has no spelling mistakes.
90
Written proposal describes software, types of ports, storage and memory specifications, as well as computer parts that would be necessary for either an art lab or a music lab. Students use at least one excellent online resource, and they show that they have thought through their decision by including a critique of the webpages Authority, Bias, Relevancy, Audience and Links. The proposal has a few minor grammatical and/or spelling errors.
80
Written proposal describes some of the necessary aspects that would be needed for either an art lab or a music lab. Students use at least one excellent online resource, and they show that they have thought through their decision by including a critique of the webpages Authority, Bias, Relevancy, Audience and Links. The proposal has a few minor grammatical and/or spelling errors.
70
Written proposal describes some of the necessary aspects that would be needed for either an art lab or a music lab. Students cite an online resource, but do not thoroughly review Authority, Bias, Relevancy, Audience and Links. The proposal has a few minor grammatical and/or spelling errors.
60
Written proposal is hardly acceptable. The information does not show research. Although they do include an online resource, it is not critiqued completely. The proposal might have many grammatical errors.


Chapter 7: Team Time - Creating a Wireless Campus
Problem:
Wireless technology is being adopted by leaps and bounds both in the home and in the workplace. Offering easy access free of physical tethers to networks seems to be a solution to many problems. However, wireless computing also has problems, ranging from poor reception to hijackers stealing your bandwidth.

Task:
Imagine that you are a college student. Your college campus has recently undertaken a wireless computing initiative. Your dorm has finally been outfitted with wireless access points (base stations) to provide students with connectivity to the Internet and the college network. However, since the installation, students have reported poor connectivity in certain areas and extremely low bandwidth at other times. You have volunteered to research the potential problems and to suggest solutions to the college IT department.

Process:
Split into pairs. In pairs, you will be assigned to one of the following issues:
1. Detecting Poor Connectivity: Research methods that can be used to find areas of poor signal strength such as signal sniffing software and handheld scanning devices such as WiFi Finder. Investigate maximum distances between access points and network nodes and make appropriate recommendations.
2. Signal boosters: Research alternatives that can be used to increase signal strength in access points, antennae, and wireless cards. Signal boosters are available for access points. You can purchase or construct replacement antennae or antennae enhancements. WiFi cards that offer higher power than conventional cards are now available.
3. Security: "Wire drivers" (people who cruise neighborhoods looking for open wireless networks from which to steal bandwidth) may be the cause of the bandwidth issues. Research appropriate measures to keep wireless network traffic secure from eavesdropping by hackers. In your investigation, look into Wi-Fi Protected Access (WPA) standard developed by the Wi-Fi Alliance. Check out the security section on the Wi-Fi Alliance Web site to start.

Present your findings to your class and discuss possible causes and preventative measures for the problems encountered at your dorm.

Rubric:
Points
Criteria
100
Presentation is clear and concise and fits perfectly into 60 to 80 seconds, and provides excellent solutions for their assigned problem. Presenters use one image or slide that helps the class to understand their main points. Presenters do not stumble over words, do not say "like" or "um" or any other similar stuttering.
90
Presentation is clear and concise and fits perfectly into 60 to 80 seconds, and provides at least one excellent solution for their assigned problem. Presenters use one image or slide that helps the class to understand their main points. Presenters may stumble over their words a bit, or say something like "um."
80
Presentation is clear and concise, but takes slightly longer than 80 seconds. Presenters use one image or slide that helps the class to understand their main points. Presenters may stumble over their words a bit, or say something like "um."
70
Presenters show that they understand their assigned topic and have a solution. The image chosen is inappropriate, unhelpful, or absent. Presenters may stumble over their words a bit, or say something like "um."
60
Presenters do not understand their assigned topic, or do not offer appropriate solutions, or are extremely unclear in their explanation.